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troops. i think we can all agree, at least i hope we can, that the taliban has morphed into a hybrid. it's one part terrorist organization, one part global drug trafficking organization. for the past two years virtually every heroin processing lab raided by the dea, united stat s special forces and afghan police had ties to the taliban.ice what our forces find when they raid drug labs is not only large quantities of opium and heroin,d but heroin, but also also im explosive devices, bomb making materials, and taliban training manuals. in just one raid last year, 2,056 pounds of the highest grade heroin with wholesale value of $6 million was seized. experts agree it may take many years to get the drug trade in afghanistan under control. therefore, as the united states military begins to scale back its presence this month, i think we've got to ensure our civilians continue to support counter narcotics efforts in afghanistan. i think that's really important. a year ago this month this caucus released a bipartisan report entitled united states counter narcotics strategy in afghanistan, which
forces have been bearing down on al qaeda and the taliban in pakistan and afghanistan. osama bin laden has been killed and al qaeda is significantly weakened. in afghanistan british and international forces have driven al qaeda from its bases and while it is too early to tell for certain initial evidence suggests we halted the momentum of the taliban insurgency in its heartland. mr. speaker, we are entering a new phase in which the afghan forces will do more of the fighting and patrolling and our forces training and mentoring. as president obama said last month the mission is changing from, that to support. when we arrived there was no one to hand over to. no proper army or police. in many places across the country the afghan security forces now stand ready to begin the process of taking over security responsibility. success in afghanistan requires a number of critical steps. the first is making sure the afghan security forces are able to secure their own territory. there have been well known problems especially with the afghan police but there has been real progress in the last two ye
led political entitlement. the death of bin laden presents the taliban with a moment of choice. al qaeda are weakened. their leader is dead. last month the u n adopted two separate sanctions regimes creating a clear distinction to separate taliban from al qaeda. local peace councils havbeen established in almost all afghanistan's provinces allow 1800 people from 17 provinces to be enrolled for reintegration. we should take this opportunity to send a clear message to the taliban that now is the time to break al qaeda and participate in a peaceful political process. in this task we need pakistan's assistance. as i discussed last week as much in pakistan's interest as britain or afghanistan. the taliban pose a more wolf read to the states of pakistan as well. mr. speaker there is no reason afghanistan should be destined to remain a broken country. it has fertile agricultural land and stands at the crossroads of asia's training program. it has succeeded in the past when not wracked by conflict. afghanistan has many challenges ahead. there are security issues and lack of government capa
to haunt them. u.s. and the taliban. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> oil companies have changed my country. >> oil companies can make a difference. >> we have the chance to build the economy. >> create jobs, keep people healthy, and improve schools. >> ...and our communities. >> in angola chevron helps train engineers, teachers and farmers, launch child's programs. >> it's not just good business. >> i'm hopeful about my country's future. >> it's my country's future. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: with little more than a week until the debt ceiling deadline, lawmakers on both sides of capitol hill offered competing plans today on how to avert a crisis. and late today,
host, the taliban, in both pakistan and afghanistan. in pakistan, osama bin laden has been killed and al qaeda significantly weakened. in afghanistan british and international forces have driven al qaeda from its bases and while it's too early to tell for certain, initial evidence suggests we have halted the taliban insurgency in the heartland of helmand province. mr. speaker, we are now entering a new phase in which the afghan forces will do more of the fighting and patrolling and our forces more training and mentoring. as president obama said in his address last month, the mission is changing from combat to support. when we arrived, there was no one to hand over to, no proper army, no police force. in many places across the country the afghan security forces now stand ready to begin the process of taking over security responsibility. mr. speaker, success in afghanistan requires a number of critical steps. the first is making sure that the afghan security forces are able to secure their own territory. now, i know there have been well-known problems, especially, with the afghan po
with a friend with a k-47. he was a key power broker in the fight with the taliban. we're live from kabul. it's tuesday, july 12th. let's get right to the first reads of the morning. we start with the deadlock. this afternoon the two sides are farther apart than they've ever been. they were farther apart yesterday when -- then they were even sunday and farther apart sunday then they were thursday. the question is whether the daily meetings are going to continue. the president said he's shooting for the biggest possible deal and asking if not now, when. listen. >> we think it's hard now. imagine how these guys are going to be thinking six months from now in the middle of election season when they are all up. it's not going to get easier, it's going to get harder. we might as well do it now. pull off the band-aid. eat our peas. >> also in the room, eric cantor laid out what was agreed to in the biden talks, which is about $1.5 trillion in cuts, still nearly a trillion dollars short of the amount required to finance a debt deal through 2012. republicans said it needs to be dollar for dollar. the
in a helicopter crash after a firefight with taliban drug traffickers that also claimed the lives of seven serviceman. on october29th, 2009, the remains of dea special agents forest lehman, chad michael, michael westin, and the fallen united states service members were met by president obama at dover air force base. he honored the men and paid his respects at the dignified transfer ceremony. co-chairman grassley and i wish to convene our deepest condolences to the families of these dea agents that gave their lives fighting narcotics trafficking in afghanistan and hereby enter their obituaries into the record for today's hearing. its hard i think for both of us to realize that we have people who carry out these missions and get killed carrying out these missions, and they do our country great service, and not much is said about it. but this committee wants everyone to know that we very much appreciate that service and we certainly honor it in the best way we can. so i would now like to turn to my co-chairman, senator grassley, for his opening statement. >> thank you for honoring the memory
experience in the south. in the south, there is a lot of open combat. this is the headquarters of the taliban. >> in the east the violence depends on where you are. these to have strong relationships with kabul, with a lot of traffic. today, these are what i call, bombing galleries, where the coalition troops and a large coalition presence is trying very hard to like this town in order to protect this. but every step that they take, they are threatened. thousands every year, that are killing hundreds of native troops, and many times the number of afghans. as we move closer to the border, and you had se, the threat will change. this is not so much ied's because there is less vehicle traffic. the coalition soldiers and the taliban will move on foot. the coalition has helicopters, but then they are back to walking around on foot. this is a lot less useful and they are optimized for -- in places like this you see more small arms fire, lots of snipers. this looks like a street battle in world war two, on a smaller scale. people throwing grenades and things like this. on the coalition side, there i
right now to go ahead and get the kids out of the room, but this is a video released by taliban insurgents in pakistan and it shows more than a dozen men believed to be pakistani policemen lined up. there they are, against the backdrop of the hillside with their hands tied behind their backs facing several men with rifles on the right side of your screen. this man shouting is accusing them of killing children in a crime against islam. and there they are, the men opening fire. now we froze the video right there because if you continue to watch, it gets even more graphic, even more brutal from that point on. c nrks nr cnn's reza sayah is taking up from here. >> reporter: we warn you, this is explicit video, some of you may find this very disturbing, if you want to turn away, this is a good time to do so. we want to walk you through the video, it shows at least 14 men lined up, all of them wearing traditional pakistani garb, all of them appear to have their hands tied behind their back. we assume these are taliban fighters, one of them is scolding the man who are lined up, saying t
released by taliban showing 16 men being executed. >> this is a graphic look at how brutal and ugly the war against the taliban can get. some of you may find this very disturbing. if you would like to turn away, this is a good time to do so. let's walk you through this video. it was released by the taliban, posted online. men wearing traditional pakistani garb, all of them with their hands tied behind their back. in front of them, you see three armed men, you assume these are taliban fighters. one of them is scolding the men who are lined up, accusing them of being enemies of islam, saying these executions are about to take place for six children. the military here vehemently denies those excuses took place. after the scolding is over, that's when you see and hear the gunfire. you see the men topple to the ground, some of them moaning and writhing in pain. we're not going so show you what happened next. some of the gunmen walk up to the men and shoot them again, sometimes in an effort too make sure they're dead. the military believes the men who were killed were police officers kidnapped du
are there to battle taliban coming in from afghanistan. >> reporter: kunar in eastern afghanistan is some of the toughest terrain america has troops in here. you can see this particular base is surrounded by hills on either side, which give the insurgency a central vantage point from which they can attack. the base violence is so consistent it makes it very hard for them to have the kind of contact with locals they need. life here really a waiting game for the worst to happen. everywhere you look, here in kunar on afghanistan's eastern border, the choices aren't good. outpost king is caught between hills full of taliban. if the americans leave, militants from pakistan will flow through the valley. if they stay, every few days this happens. the mortars hit the base. the last attack was long enough ago there's panic, they're worried the taliban have been preparing a big one. after days of nothing, the insurgents are finally beginning an attack from all sides. >> fire. >> command hustle up, grab it and get ready. >> reporter: they use mortars first, aiming for taliban dark into the hills but
made in the last year and reclaiminghe former taliban ronghold particularly in the south. another major change in the last year is the surge in afghan security forces. there are now 100,000 more afghan security forces than 18 months ago when president obama announced the surge and another 70,000 afghan soldiers and police will be trained and equipped by the end of next summer when all 33,000 u.s. search trips will have withdrwn. in the testimony to congress last week, the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff admiral mollen characterized the president's decision as, quote, more aggressive and incurring more risk than mcraven had initially recommended. however, admiral mullen felt, could come only the president and the end can really determine the acceptable level of risk we must take because as he put it, quote, the truth is we would have run other kind of risks by keeping more forces in afghanistan onger. and among the other risks for the risks of perpetuating the greater afgh dependent on the forces and inhibiting the growth and keep the devotee and confidence on the part of the afgha
by other guards. the taliban says the shooter was working for them. ahmed wali karzai was accused by the u.s. and local afghans of being involved in the drug trade and other illegal activities. president karzai spoke to reporters about two hours after the shooting, saying only that quote, this is the life of the afghan people, this sorrow is in every afghan home. >>> high above earth, a final walk in space. these are live pictures that we are bringing to all of you. two crew members of the international space station, you see it here, venturing out on the last space walk of nasa's space shuttle era. absolutely breathtaking. the two floated over the yucatan peninsula. take a look at these live pictures. their job today is to recover a broken pump and stow it in the cargo bay of shuttle "atlantis" which docked with the space station on sunday. the space walk was scheduled to last about six hours. the "atlantis" mission is the last of the 30-year shuttle program. "atlantis" due to return to earth on july 21st. >>> on the afghan battlefield, it was an act above and beyond the call of duty. arm
in afghanistan. they also have the pakistani taliban attacking them. we're also the point of a new low in u.s.-pakistani relations. so the idea that pakistan would instigate a crisis with india at this point is inconceivable to me. >> what about indian intelligence-gathering and a security? there have been a number of threats, particularly since 2008. is this any reflection on the indian authorities competence in this area? >> there will be questioned about another attack in mumbai. again, four attacks in the last 10 years. after 2008, there were major reviews within india about internal security, and in this case, there will be a very close examination of how quickly india responded. they have their national security guard deployed there. they have friends a unit on the scene. they need to hopefully -- they have forensic units on the scene. they need to hopefully see having that experience corrected in that beleaguered city. >> in other news, police and venezuela have regained control of a prison east of the capital after a standoff that lasted for 27 days. more than 800 inmates have not g
, taliban and others got strength and found terrorist center and now we're involved in a war that involves the future of the world, not just peace for the world, but american peace as well. indeed, i would be very caution as we go about -- cautious as we go about suggesting that we automatically walk away from the commander in chief's plan. indeed if we are not careful, the vacuum will catch up with us and america will find itself in a much broader and a much more intense struggle. with that i yield back the balance of my time. >> would the gentleman yield? the chair: the gentleman yields back? for what purpose does the gentleman from tennessee rise? >> i move to strike the last word. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for five minutes. mr. cohen: thank you. before i yield to my colleague from california to respond, i would like to mention, i appreciated mr. lewis' history, but i would suggest to you that al qaeda could have found a base in yemen, they could have found a base in the sudan, they could have found a base in other places. there was nothing particularly unique about afghani
of the taliban dead in up next, the latest on the rumors. >>> i was absolutely shocked, appalled and ashamed when i heard about the case only two week ago. >> some unexpected fireworks as rupert murdoch testified before parliament about the british hacking scandal. we have more of what he had to say. stay with us. when water doesn't dry, it can leave spots and film. finish jet dry rinse agent removes residue and actively dries dishes, for a brilliant shine straight from the dishwasher. finish jet dry rinse agent. finish. the diamond standard. >>> the taliban are denying their leader is dead. a spokesman for the taliban says there is no truth to the report that he has died. they claim that i text message sent to journalists was fake and was the result of a phone hack. rumors have spread that he died after a text message allegedly sent from a spokesman announced his death. >>> two american citizens are charged with asking as agents to the pakistani government. said faye lives in fairfax and is the director of the kashmiri american council. kashmiri is the disputed territory between india and pakist
when negotiations with the taliban move forward and it also may have very big repercussions for the u.s. effort in the south. people called president hamid karzai's brother a corrupt gangster. but the cia's former head of counterterrorism says the u.s. may miss him. >> it's quite like live that what follows is going to be something that will not work to our interest. >> reporter: an afghan official says he was gunned down in his own home, shot in the head and chest by his own guard. the taliban took credit, but it's not clear if the shooter was really working for them. >> the united states condemns in the strongest possible terms the murder of president karzai's half brother in kandahar. >> a u.s. official said quote, while we must deal with ahm ahmed wali karzai, he's widely understood to be corrupt and narcotics trafficker. the state department and u.s. military were trying to build trust in the afghan government. they frequently criticized ahmed wali, but the cia worked with him. >> i think often parts of the u.s. government were working at cross purposes where ahmed wali was conce
for their ability to move forward with the anti-taliban campaign. they held their nos because this guy was corrupt dealing in the drug trade, although he denied the allegations but it was believed he was fueling the drug trade, as well as profiting from private security contractors as well. it is something that is going to worry the u.s. about the stability of afghanistan and of the region and it will benefit the taliban. >> zain verjee, definitely a story we will continue to keep following and see what impact it does have on politics there. of course, his brother, the president. >>> the man with a huge collection of presidential memorabilia apparently tried to add to it illegally. we will tell you what went down. >>> crew members from the international space station have started their space walk. wait until you see and hear what they are working on. [ barks ] ♪ [ cat meows ] ♪ [ whistles ] ♪ [ cat meows ] ♪ [ ting! ] [ male announcer ] travelers can help you protect the things you care about and save money with multi-policy discounts. are you getting the coverage you need and the discount
action against the taliban as well as al qaeda. meanwhile, secretary panetta told reporters on the plane it's time to focus on defeating al qaeda once and for all. >> i think we had undermined their ablthd to conduct 9/11-type attacks. we had them on the run. >> secretary panetta met with american military officials. atia abawi is in afghanistan. good morning. bring us up to date. >> good morning. panetta's very first trip as secretary of defense to afghanistan, before he landed he brought up the situation with al qaeda. he said, quote, the strategic defeat of al qaeda is within reach. this is a time to go after him, especially after bin laden. let's listen to what he had to say. >> now is the moment following what happened with bin laden, to put maximum pressure on them because i do believe that, if we continue this effort, that we can really cripple al qaeda. >> panetta said that, in fact, in that information they found from bin laden's compound it points to 10 to 20 key leaders of al qaeda in different places such as pakistan, yemen, somalia and different parts of africa. but coming b
in addition of karzai's brother's assassination, it is still the same thing. >>shepard: the taliban are still, in large part, with their judicial system on wheels, and still have much in control in many places? >>guest: yes, but the taliban is shifting. they are trying to get back into power but, at the same time, the north has form add new political alliance that will never let the taliban rule so we are headed for a divisive period in politics over the next two or three years. >>shepard: what is your sense as this wraps up, what might have been accomplished? >>guest: we have shifted afghanistan toward america's values and ideas and when you go to kabul or kandahar and walk around people feel like they are part of the world and no longer buried in a draconian regime. we have done an amazing amount of good work with the infrastructure projects. but we took that country from zero to 60 in 10 years so you will see a lot, a lot, a lot of fighting and infighting, as well, much like when the russians left. people will make grabs for power in the power vacuum. so both good and bad. >>shepard: we're
once again become a haven for al-qaeda should the taliban ever return to power there. that is according to the top u.s. commander in afghanistan general david petraeus. as you may know, later this month general petraeus will be stepping down from his role to head the cia and in an interview with fox the general said the military has had a lot of success eradicating militants but cautioned that the job is not over. >> that task has been accomplished but, of course, it is threatened because, of course, the taliban allowed al-qaeda on afghan soil when it ran the country and we believe that there is a high likelihood that that would happen again. >> the general has also said that the military focus will soon shift from taliban strongholds to the boarder with pakistan. >>> capture or kill. that reportedly is the question the obama administration is internally debating when it comes to what to do about wanted terrorists. we all know capturing suspects in the mountains of pakistan or in yemen is not easy and if the recent uptick in predator drone strikes is any indication it appears the white
's speculation of everybody from the cia to drug lords to the taliban. >> absolutely. that speculation is still runs. it's not clear whether his absence will have that big of a stabilizing effect. from the united states point of view karzai's brother caused a lot of problems, he was always playing a double game, but he managed a lot of relationships. he had the charisma to maintain that network. for karzai. that was crucial. you can see how karzai really needed a counterbalance to the taliban when it came to now we have to see who can fill that void try to manage those relationship nots to mention the lucrative narcotics routes to try to maintain the piece while u.s. forces are there. more importantly, though, the real focus we have is the u.s./pakistani negotiation and whether pakistan can come through in developing some sort of accommodate with the taliban that would allow the u.s. to disengage. >> dave, go ahead. >> what is the impact of the united states drawing down in afghanistan? i'm talking about police actions and espionage, which we can pursue anyway. what is the impact of us drawing
discovered during a trip to remote afghanistan, there are signs that the taliban and al qaeda see an opening. >> reporter: we pushed down into the valley. still an insurgent stronghold. high-tech american attack helicopters buzzed overhead until militants shot at them from up the valley. >> it's uncharacteristic for the taliban around here. they're getting gutsy. if you push up farther than that, you're going to take enemy contact. it's pretty certain. >> nick payton walsh joins us from kabul. the lieutenant said the taliban is getting, quote, pretty gutsy. where does this confidence come from, and does it it stem in part from the fact they know the americans are leaving? >> reporter: i think that's true to a certain extent. the gutsiness is perhaps a suggestion that some fighters there are foreign. u.s. officials identifying what they believe were safe havens there before they launched a large operation into that particular area. the focus was on pakistan's safe havens there. that where many in washington believe al qaeda was hiding. big concerns they naif found a breathing space in afghani
where we are training security forces and where we are working to provide stability against the taliban and the kind of structure that we need to support going after al qaeda in pakistan and afghanistan -- that perhaps it is time to shut down $17 billion worth of money going to reconstruction projects when our track record really stings. i hope you all will convince me i am too cynical and angry and frustrated about the way we are spending money in theater. and i want to tell you, i am looking for good news and i hope we hear some today. there are too many people in missouri saying why can we fix this road, and then i look of the projects we are doing in afghanistan and it is very hard to explain to them why we can't fix that the road because we can't afford it -- yet we can throw money away in afghanistan on projects that were clearly not sustainable. and anybody spend any time thinking about it in the first place we would realize that. that kind of planning has to begin happening and that kind of accountability has to be present. senator portman is here. i will give him a time to get
, the u.s. cut of $800 million in aid to pakistan. it turns out the taliban is claiming responsibility for the assassination of the half brother of the afghan president hamid karzai. ahmad wali karza was considered by many to be the most powerful man in afghanistan. his bodyguards killed the attacker. coming up on abc-seven usenews at noon new details in the privacy scandal affecting the world's biggest media mogul. and, a facelift for a local shelter. volunteers are making major changes. but first our >> fire officials are investigating a fire that destroyed a manhattan synagogue last night. firefighter suffered minor injuries when the roof collapsed. the fire left much of the upper east side blanketed in smoke. the historic synagogue was undergoing renovations, and now the congregation wants to rebuild. >>> today is the last space walk of the shuttle missions. ♪ i love you more than the sun and the stars in the sky. ♪ astronauts are currently working to retrieve a broken ammonia pump. they will end their 13-day mission next week, marking an end to the shuttle program. >>> in bri
rough. the coalition troops and the taliban moved on foot. the coalition also has helicopters that can get them between mountain tops. they would be back to walking around on foot. these are law that useful. -- a lot less useful. they are used for blowing up vehicles. in some places, you see more small arms. this sort of looks like a world war ii street battle on a smaller scale. guys running around with rifles and tossing grenades, things like that. on the coalition side, there is a significant air power aspect of it as well. the tactical security threats to nato troops. >> this is located in the far most peace which is a ride along the border. this is a critical area for cross border infiltration as well as a historic avenue and the movement of supplies. >> in terms of the risk to u.s. troops, how would you characterize this? >> i would characterize this as high as venture. there is a significant influx of insurgent fighters to the area. >> we are prepared to go on a mission, tell me about that and what it is for. >> this is a standard reconnaissance mission. we're going in there to
planned. u.s. officials say they killed 120 insurgents and top leaders, many taliban, but several of them arabs linked to al qaeda, damaging their network. yet the clashes revealed that al qaeda for years said to be mostly across the border in pakistan is again a concern, back where they started in afghanistan's hills. we pushed down into the valley, still an insurgent stronghold. high tech american attack helicopters buzzed overhead until militants shot at them from up the valley. >> it is uncharacteristic for the taliban, i know, from around here. they're getting pretty gutsy. right past there, usually our patrols don't push it too far past that. if you push it far past that, you'll take enemy contact, it is pretty certain. >> reporter: the afghans clear about who lay in wait for them ahead. >> translator: it is very dangerous. there are taliban, arabs,
a pretty scathing piece for politico in which you compared the tea party to the taliban. is that going a bit far? >> i was trying to point out that they're inflexible. the taliban, as you know, blew up centuries old statues of buddha because they wanted to be religiously pure, just as the tea party has threatened to bring down the government economically by not agreeing to raising the debt ceiling unless they get 100% of what they want. that's not realistic. no one gets 100% in this world except maybe some extremists like the taliban. we don't do 100% in this country and no one -- they should stop holding out for everything that they originally wanted and agree and declare victory. they've won quite a bit. >> rick: david, as you surveyed the gop landscape heading into 2012, how has the tea party changed the picture for republicans and is it for the better? >> it's for the better from a point that we are finally talking about fiscal responsibility again in this country. we're finally talking about doing the things to get the economy going in the right direction, which under barak obama
making against the taliban as well as al qaeda. as well as $800 million in assistance could be suspended. this could cause some major problems. if pakistan takes tougher action, the aid could resume. mean while, defense secretary leon panetta is in afghanistan. panetta is meeting with american military leaders and afghan officials. nbc's atia abawi is in kabul this morning. bring us up to speed on what leon panetta is saying that al qaeda is basically on the run and close to being completely stamped out. >> reporter: good morning, thomas. the new secretary of defense's first trip as the defense secretary here in afghanistan, prior to arriving he talked to reporters on the plane about how he feels alg al qaeda is going right now, the war against terror. he says the strategic defeat of al qaeda is within reach, primarily pointing the the death of bin laden, the information they got from the compound including names of different key al qaeda leaders. he says this is the time to actually end the war with al qaeda. let's listen to what he had to say. >> now is the moment following what happen
of afghanistan's leading clerics. the president's brother was assassinated at his home on tuesday. the taliban claimed responsibility for that killing. the commander of nato forces in afghanistan, and general david petraeus, has been holding security talks in pakistan as divisions deepen between washington and islamabad. the u.s. is holding hundreds of millions of dollars in security assistance. pakistan has called for an end to u.s. drone raids that have been taking an increasing civilian toll. >> u.s. drones' fly it around the clock in pakistan, targeting fighters in the mountainous region bordering afghanistan. civilians are often killed in the attacks. pakistan has condemned the ground strikes as a violation of its sovereignty, although some analysts believe they are carried out with the help of pakistan the -- pakistani intelligence. >> we are firmly against all terrorist groups. but we fight in partnership with other law-enforcement agencies. >> washington announced it was holding back a third of the military aid earmarked for pakistan, $100 million. airstrikes are putting more pressure
. the -- the whole issue is on that border. the border with afghanistan, waziristan, taliban, al qaeda, other troops are operating. >> pakistan will continue the fight, even without the $800 million in military aid, it will continue the fight against the militants. a lot of people are saying, where have you been until now? what fight is taking place at this point? >> it's true. it's a fair criticism. it's a fair criticism that the pakistanis haven't done enough in certain areas. you have to balance that by saying it's a very tough fight for them as well. they've lost 30,000 troops fighting terror in their country. they've had numerous terror attacks. they're doing hard. it's not like it's sitting on their hands. there long has been, the continues to be things as that security services are helping some groups that are anti-u.s. the anti-u.s. sentiment in the company are not diminishing, but growing. >> i have to talk about the royals. >> it's your thing. >> prince william in california playing polo? i love this. >> he did well, he scored goals as well. i wonder if the defense was a little bit loose t
to pledges to uproot and disband taliban militia. tensions between the two countries increased since navy seals killed osama bin laden in may in pakistan. >>> prince william and kate are comfortably back on british soil. they wrapped up their first official trip overseas since getting married. the duke and duchess of cambridge dazzled enthusiastic crowds at every stop in canada and in los angeles. the fully enjoy the trip and are hoping to return someday. >> i heard that they went home commercial. >> what? ipods they would be like broil -- i thought they would be like royal [unintelligible] >>>>> this camera is in ijamsville maryland. not very hazy, but it is hot and sticky. something must be going on over at the football field. 88 degrees right now in stafford. when you factor in the humidity, it feels like 102. if 92 in woodbrige, feels like 101. chevy chase 92, feels like 99. martinsburg, 91, feels like 101. temperatures in the mid 90's this afternoon. 91 degrees in culpeper, 88 in southern maryland. when you factor in the humidity, it will feel like the mid 90's. probably 94 degrees o
and promised to tackle inequality and corruption. >>> taliban militants have carried out a major attack in southern afghanistan using multiple suicide bombers, rocket-propelled grenades, and machine guns. more than 20 people were killed, including a bbc reporter. it targeted the offices of the deputy governor, the police headquarters, and a private security firm. >>> you are watching "newsday." still to come, the u.s. and north korea hold talks in new york. >> in the footsteps of john steinbeck, we find out what life is like for americans 20 -- seven years after the great book was published -- more than 70 years after the great book was published. >>> norwegian police have finished their search for bodies on the island. anders breivik has admitted to killing 68 people. prosecutors say he will be interrogated friday. we have this report from oslo. >> at the cathedral, the floral carpet continues to grow. this person knows that one of these attributes could easily been for him. he came face-to-face with the gun man and lift. >>-- and lived,. >> he started shooting around me and he got sev
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